Alerting teachers to life threatening allergies

My sister sent me this image of her little one and it was such a cute idea I had to share.

Her children have some pretty severe allergies but neither are old enough to be able to articulate exactly how bad the allergies are. She wanted a simple way that the teacher could share with substitutes and other staff about the boys allergies. She came up with a simple plan.

Here’s what you’ll need:

Small dry erase board – the boys made these at a Home Depot Free Kids Craft Day

Camera

Instructions:

Write the child’s allergies on the board and then make a “NO” sign over them. Have the child hold the board while you take a picture. The image can then be emailed or printed at a local store for a few cents. The teacher can put printed images in her substitute folder or place them with any paperwork being distributed to other teachers (art, gym, music). Even if the teacher doesn’t know the child’s name she will be able to recognize that this child has a severe allergy.

 

The end of a chapter

17 years ago I never even really thought about what this moment would be like. We had just moved into a new home as our apartment was to small for 3. That August, 4 weeks before my due date, we welcomed a 6 lbs 9 oz baby home. He hit the ground running and hasn’t looked back. Walked early, talked early and developed a love of reading early.

We homeschooled until he was 12 at which point we decided to send him to a private school for more advanced subjects. At 12 he tested into the 12th grade academically, but we knew he wasn’t ready emotionally for high school. Instead he went into 7th grade and later high school, where he majored in Drafting. Despite all his extra curricular activities he still found time to participate in a college credit program. He is graduating high school with a few college credits already under his belt.

He’s graduating high school. It sounds so foreign. It’s going to be strange having him leave for college in the fall. He has a confidence and understanding of the world that I never had at that age. He knows what he wants and has a plan to get it. I’m so proud.

Simple Learning Games for Kids

Even before I homeschooled I was always trying to figure out fun ways to help my children learn. These games don’t require a degree in education or a need lot of money to do. Most don’t even require any¬†preparation. Most of these games were originally designed for younger children, but a few simple modifications and the games can continue to be used with older children.

Alphabet/Word Game

This game has no physical items and can be easily adjusted to your circumstances or child’s ability. The basic concept is to pick a letter and have your child tell you when they find the letter or an object that begins with that letter. As the child gets older you can run through the alphabet one letter at a time instead of focusing on a single letter. With older children you can have them pick words were the letter comes at the end or have them spell the words that they pick.

War Card Game - Battle

Image by PlanningQueen

Math War

The card game war is a childhood classic. It requires two players and a traditional deck of cards.

Basic Rules:

  1. Each player should have a half of the deck. Keep the cards face down.
  2. The players turn over the top card of their deck at the same time.
  3. The person with the higher card wins both cards and places them on the bottom of their deck
  4. If both cards are the same then you “declare war” by placing 3 cards upside down on the played card, then play a fourth card right side up.
  5. The person with the higher value card wins all the cards in play.
  6. The player with all of the cards is the winner.

Math Rules:

The only difference here is that the cards in step 2 are added or multiplied together. The player who correctly solves the math problem first wins the cards. Steps 4 and 5 are eliminated in the Math Rules due to the math problems being solved. In this version face cards are worth 10 points. So a King and 4 would be 14 or 40 depending on if you are doing addition or multiplication.

Pass the Pigs

This game can be found in toy stores for about $5. I always keep this game in my purse, even now, as it’s a great way to pass time in restaurants while working on math skills. The game consists of 2 plastic pigs and a score pad. The pigs have a dot drawn on one side of them. The pigs are rolled like dice and points are given based on how they land. If they land with one dot up and one dot down then you have a “Pig Out” and you lose your turn.

We have modified the rules to eliminate the score pad. Instead we continue rolling, and adding, until someone pigs out. The pigs are then passed to the next person to see if they can beat the previous score. I prefer this method as it gives the child practice with adding bigger numbers and the game can be easily ended when food arrives at the table or the doctor is ready to see us.

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